Maybe having a cold is a reason to celebrate?!

I have a cold. Big deal right? Granted, I do get colds once in a while, but literally, I can count the times I’ve had a cold or the flu, together, on one hand since 2004 (the year of the onslaught of my disease). I asked my Neurologist about this once and he explained that he’s heard the same from others with MS that he works with. He explained, “Your immune system is hyped up.” That made sense to me and was what I also suspected. It is my antibodies attacking my own body because somewhere along the line, the lines of transmission were crossed and the antibodies mistook my myelin as a foreign threat to the system and they attack. Since my myelin is always there, my antibodies are always on guard. Weird, huh? A benefit of having MS. Of course, I’ll take the cold or flu over a MS attack any day.

So, I’m thinking, but certainly could be wrong, that this cold may be a sign that my immune system has relaxed a bit. Is it a sign of healing or the odd cold I would’ve gotten anyway? One will only know as time goes by. Before I sickened with MS, I traditionally got one cold and one flu most years. We’ll see how that goes in years to come. I’d be interested in posing this question to everyone on the Wahls Protocol Facebook page, we have members following longer then me. As well, I’m curious to know if other autoimmune illnesses experience this phenomenon. A two part question then. It is a diverse group of autoimmune illness sufferer’s treating their respective diseases with the Protocol. The perfect place to ask a question like that.

No exercise this week, a bummer. But, I’m sure that my classmates appreciated me not putting my body with its accompanying cold in a body of water with them. I will resume Sunday. I am feeling better today. Its hard to eat when everything tastes like metal, yuk. I had cold seed porridge with blueberries and coconut milk for the first meal and banger’s and mashed cauliflower and carrot for dinner. Didn’t get the greens in today, but that’s okay, we’ll catch up when I get my appetite and taste buds back. For now, I’m off to rest some more.

 

Bonne Sante

 

Picture from Pexels: https://www.pexels.com/photo/short-red-hair-woman-blowing-her-nose-41284/

What’s the deal with Vitamin D?

The real question ought to be, “Why is Vitamin D a problem right now?” Because when I was a child and into my twenties, it wasn’t an issue. I’m 55, so I am referring to the 60’s, 70’s and 80’s. Back then, I sported a dark brown tan every summer and in my twenties I kept it up year round using tanning booths in the winter. In my childhood, we didn’t talk about sun screen. Babies wore sun hats, mother’s kept them covered, toddlers ran around with tans. My brother and I have olive toned skin and many remarked to our mother about our beautiful dark tans. People who had very pale skin, were cautious when in the sun, but still out in the sun, they were the only ones I saw using salves to protect themselves from burning aside from life guards with bright white stripes of sun block on their noses. We all suffered a sunburn sometimes. I don’t recommend them, they’re not fun, but for most of us, they weren’t the end of the world either.

Its true, too much sun could damage skin and for a few, cause skin cancer. But, I feel we’ve gone way too far in the other direction, where we get no sun anymore. Especially in the north where sun is limited to begin with. In the summer we slather the highest SPF lotions we can find, lest the sun touch our skin. All my life, I’ve met only 2 people with skin cancer (mild cases). And, before you get all up in arms, be rest assured that I am not disputing that skin cancer is real, and maybe its only a coincidence that I’ve only met two people. I am only suggesting moderation and balance. For most people, some sun is not just good, but needed. Sun light is needed to produce vitamin D. It can be had through supplements too, which is what I do. I take 10,000 IUs of Vitamin D3 per day in the form of drops. Fair skinned Dr. Wahls takes 6,000 IUs in the winter along with short visits in a tanning bed and decreases to 4,000 IUs in the summer, whereas she is an avid Gardner and rides her bike to and from work most days.

It is a fact that lack of Vitamin D has been linked to autoimmune diseases and other equally surprising conditions:

“A lack of vitamin D has also been linked to some other conditions such as cancer, asthma, type-II diabetes, high blood pressure, depression, Alzheimer’s and autoimmune diseases like multiple sclerosis, Crohn’s and type-I diabetes.” – https://www.vitamindcouncil.org/about-vitamin-d/what-is-vitamin-d/

Yes, we had these diseases then too, but not to the outrageous degree that they are now prevalent in our society these days. When I was a child, I met one person who had MS. In my twenties, I knew another. Two people in two decades. The last two decades the opposite has been true, autoimmune diseases of all sorts are cropping up everywhere in cooler climate industrialized nations. Interesting though is the fact that I knew two people my entire life who had skin cancer, the kind they can remove. That is not to say that it doesn’t exist, that it shouldn’t be a prudent concern, especially for those with fair skin, who are most susceptible to damage. The darker your skin is the more melanin you produce, which is the skins natural defense against the sun that, paradoxically, is produced when the skin is exposed to sun light.

Melanin gives the skin its pigment. The darker your skin is the better protected you are from the sun. This is the reason why warmer climates have darker skinned people. A natural occurrence to the environment. My grandparents are from Southern Italy, hence the olive tone to my skin and gives me a decreased chance of sun burns. I can burn. I need to be cautious the first one or two times out in the sun and use sun block. Once a tan begins to build, I don’t burn anymore. A tan is the skin producing melanin in response to the sun for protection.

I am not an expert, but I have left three addresses from both sides below.  I suggest that you take the time to read up. It is important to say that Vitamin D is not the only reason for the sharp increase in autoimmune conditions, there are other factors, which is why Vitamin D is only one of the components of the Protocol, but it is definitely a factor.

 

Bonne Sante

 

https://www.livestrong.com/article/373895-how-to-help-your-body-produce-more-melanin/

https://www.skincancerprevention.org/skin-cancer/risk-factors

https://www.vitamindcouncil.org/about-vitamin-d/what-is-vitamin-d/

 

 

All or Nothing? I Pick All.

When I tackle something, I have learned through the years of my life to bring all of myself or nothing. I am an open book. Following the Wahls Protocol and how I am defeating MS is no different. My goals for this blog have been:

  • To help keep myself motivated and accountable
  • To provide a detailed record of one person’s healing
  • To inspire others
  • To give a truthful account, good and bad
  • To share helpful information and shortcuts that I have learned
  • To give a realistic account that does show how hard, yet how doubly rewarding this has been and is
  • To prove that its all worth it

At this time, as I have written in the past few blogs, I am rehabilitating in preparation for the workforce. I will have a job that fully utilizes all that I have to offer. Too be successful, I have had to look at some tough to swallow truths about myself. I have written about these as I deal with them. Is it wise to publicly speak of a crippling past fear of success, of horrible wreckage at the hands of MS, of darker issues that I have worked very hard to successfully overcome, thereby preparing me for a one hundred percent commitment to the Wahls Protocol?

Fear….what if a future employer reads about these issues and discriminates and I lose the opportunity for this job or that? Here’s my answer to that…..I bring all of myself or nothing. That includes any future job on my horizon. My learned skills, my experiences, and my wisdom comes with me. I once lived in a self constructed prison, terrified that the world would know where I’ve been and what I’ve done and that secretly, deep down inside, I knew you knew that I was worthless. It has taken me a long time to overcome that. Today, I have so much to give, so much I want to learn, and so much to share. Because of the Wahls Protocol, my body is finally catching up to my ambition and drive to help others. My mind is out of the fog, awake and hungry to learn more.

I had a friend in the early 90’s who had Progressive MS. She was diagnosed when she was 18. She managed to complete her degree in education, but was never able to realize her potential in her chosen career. By 26, just as I met her, she lost her right to drive, her husband left her for someone else and she then had to let go of her position as the primary caregiver for their three year old son. She was athletic, she went to the gym five days a week. A tiny, muscular thing. She strained as she forced her spastic legs to walk, her hands shook uncontrollably and the day she messed herself, but then calmly gave us direction to help her, all of us embarrassed for her, whilst she stayed calmer then us all. I think often of her courage and dignity in the face of all that ugliness.

That year a new drug, the first ever, was introduced. Copaxone. I watched her face light up with a renewed hope, only to see it fall just a few days later when she was told that the drug could do nothing for her as she was Progressive. Well Joanne, I just want to say to you, I have relapsing remitting MS and I have been on Copaxone for ten years. I started the drug when I had 20 lesions and now I have double that. I too lost my ability to drive, lost my ability to work, had incontinent bowels and had to give up primary care of my children. So, my dear friend, you missed nothing. She died a few years later, bedridden. When I was diagnosed with MS in 2004, I immediately thought of Joanne. Terrified, having watched what it did to her. If she had been given the knowledge that I have been given, she would’ve jumped on that band wagon in a heartbeat. She was far more disciplined than I am. If she’d known that Dr. Swank had published his 30 year trial on MS and diet with astounding results around the same time as the release of Copaxone, she’d be here telling me about the new exploits of her now adult son.

That’s why I have a responsibility to share my experience, strength and hope and that includes the dark stuff. So anyone afflicted with not just MS, but other autoimmune conditions, can have a chance to take control of their own health again or even better, prevent themselves from ever developing one of these diseases. This is my personal journey, and like all journey’s, though they may be the same road, each will be its own.

My success is in memory of Joanne.

 

Bonne Sante

 

Picture from Pexels: https://www.pexels.com/photo/adult-background-beach-blue-296282/

Living Proof in Early February in Calgary

Below is the information to see Living Proof in Calgary, where and when:

No automatic alt text available.
MS Hope

Landmark Cinemas Canada is hosting screenings of Matt Embry’s documentary Living Proof February 03-05!

Saturday Feb. 03, 2018 1 p.m.
Sunday Feb. 04, 2018 1 p.m.
Monday Feb. 05, 2018 7 p.m.

Surrey – Landmark Cinemas 12 Guilford
GTA – Landmark Cinemas 24 Whitby
Ottawa – Landmark Cinemas 24 Kanata
Calgary – Landmark Cinemas 16 Country Hills
Edmonton – Landmark Cinemas 9 City Centre

TICKETS
Available soon @ https://www.landmarkcinemas.com/film-info/living-proof

Off to see the Social Worker tomorrow!

I have my appointment with her tomorrow at 9 am. Our discussion will be about my intent to go back to work, the possible fall outs, the logistical nightmare with not one but two disability programs in the US and Canada, the need to assess skills against disability I still have, and fears associated with past disasters as a result of unexpected attacks throwing monkey wrenches reocurring again in my life. From there I will have appointments with Occupational Therapists and the MS Psychologist.

When I am done with this phase of my rehabilitation, then I will contact Champions, which is a career counseling program specifically for the disabled. I have a tricky resume and a past full of black holes. Examples:

  • I have 64 college credits in business and writing with a high GPA, but I can’t get my transcripts due to a government bankruptcy I was forced to declare at that time due to, you guessed it, MS.
  • I sold credit cards for MBNA for three years and was one of that telesales center’s best sales performers and sales coaches. But, MBNA sold out to Bank of America, so I have no reference that I can give an employer.
  • I spearheaded grassroots, non profit events from the ground up over 15 years, all successes, all unpaid. The college degree was to back up my experience with a bachelors in business and a minor in writing. The plan was to be a professional events planner.
  • I have seven years experience as a Mental Health Technician. Two years as an Aid at a State Hospital and trained in Crisis Intervention with five years experience on an Acute Mental Health Unit at a community hospital. But, a long time ago, 1980-1982 and 1989-1994, a. shows my age (55), which can discriminate myself from getting the first interview and back then, you didn’t have to have a degree or certificate for these positions. I was hired for the five year position based on my two years experience at the state hospital.
  • Then there’s the years disabled. How do I deal with that with an interviewer and on my resume. Tough one, of which I am not alone. I am assuming that Champions Career Counseling is familiar with this conundrum.

You see the issues, I have a lot of honed skills, but not much proof on paper, although testing will help and once I am hired, my actions will show over time what I am capable of. But, ….to get there. Well, I guess that’s where my Higher Power comes in. I’ll do the foot work, the rest is not mine to control.

Most important to see is that I am on a vista that has a far ranging future. I do not anticipate a future MS attack, not on this lifestyle. Can I gauge that by my own experience, no, its only been ten months. I can, however, gauge it by the many others I’ve talked with and listened to online and in person, who have followed this lifestyle and kept their autoimmune illnesses at bay and in check for years and for some decades. I know this works. Once upon a time, I couldn’t predict what could happen with this illness, now, I feel confident to say, I can.

Wish me luck as I move out into this phase of my journey to health!

 

Bonne Sante

Milestones and Recipe Websites

This was a big milestone for me today. I live one Kilometer from the main drag where the grocery store, bank, train station, and butcher are. Four years ago I could walk to this street, but dragged my leg the last ten minutes of the walk, which then required a forty-five minute rest. I’d go to the coffee house and sip a latte and wait for my leg to rejoin me while I read newspapers and worked crossword puzzles before continuing my shopping. This has been my best since 2010. As I got sicker, it became necessary for me to take a bus, saving my energy for shopping, eventually, progressing to taking my walker and using a taxi, and worse, almost never going unless I absolutely had to, so sick and weak had I become. Well, today I went for that walk. Overtime on the Wahls Protocol, I had progressed back to the long customary walk, dragging my leg at the end and resting, which was a huge milestone to have that back. Today though, I stayed strong, no leg dragging, no need for the rest. Did my grocery shopping in two stores and never faltered. Its been years!

At the grocery store, I decided to buy a bottle of Ghee (clarified butter). I usually make my own, but I must admit, I don’t do a thorough job, which isn’t good. I decided that I wasn’t saving much by making my own and bought the bottle for $8.49. The cashier was a little lady from India with the customary red dot on her forehead, she looked like she was over 70 years old and spoke with a very thick accent. She picked up the ghee to scan and asked, “Where are you from?” Understanding that she was really asking if I was from India, I replied, “I’m Italian from the US.” She explained, “I see no one with ghee. I make ghee. We only eat ghee, never whole butter. Butter has enzymes that do not digest well and cause allergies. Clarifying takes that out, I make my own. I thought that you must be from India.” I explained to her that the popularity of ghee is increasing for the reasons she just stated. I thought, “See, she knows. They’ve known for generations how bad straight dairy is.” I swear, the more science we have, the stupider we get! Forgive me for that harsh opinion. I love science. There are many reasons for this ignorance. It was easier to say it in one, broad sentence, a catch all.

Okay, onto more resources:

Clean 15 Dirty Dozen lists

Important to know about the “Clean fifteen dirty dozen” list. This is a list that will tell you which fresh produce has the lowest and highest incidences of pesticides, denoting which should be bought, if possible, organic and which is safe to eat non organic. For example, strawberries are number one on the dirty list, because strawberries are thin skinned and porous, allowing pesticides to get into the fruit, while avocados are number one on the clean list, one reason being their hard shell. Good list to have. This is a complete guide to the lists: EWG’s Shopper’s Guide to Pesticides in Produce   This takes you to the page that explains the key points of the study. Explore the rest of the site, the pages index is at the top of the page. The pages titled Clean 15 and Dirty Dozen each have the respective lists, the About page explains how and where the data comes from.

Recipe Websites

https://nomnompaleo.com/

https://www.jaysbakingmecrazy.com/

https://elanaspantry.com/

https://www.thepaleomom.com/category/recipes/

https://meatified.com/recipe-index/

https://www.stupideasypaleo.com/recipe-index/

https://meljoulwan.com/category/recipes/

http://grazedandenthused.com/

https://detoxinista.com/recipes/

 

Well, that should be enough to get you going on recipes!

 

Bonne Sante

 

Picture from Pexels: https://www.pexels.com/photo/vegetables-and-tomatoes-on-cutting-board-255501/

A message from Dr. Terry Wahls

Reprinted here with permission from Dr. Wahls:

I am aware that some individuals have posted concerns about the costs of functional medicine. I saw that people have been expressing concern, frustration and anger that functional medicine costs so much, or even anger that I charge so much for a consultations in my private practice. – hence I am writing this post.
Functional medicine is very time intensive. Yesterday I spent 6 hours on one person’s first visit with me. A conventional physician would have been able to spend 30 or 45 minutes and then 10 to 15 minutes per visit for the follow up. A detailed review of all of the environmental factors, diet, lifestyle and environmental factors that contributed to the health decline is very time intensive. This is why functional medicine practitioners are not able to take insurance. If they do, they cannot pay their staff (or their liability insurance) or themselves. Furthermore if they do take insurance, the health insurance company is likely to complete a practice audit and force the practitioner to refund to the health insurance company any payment for services – as functional medicine evaluations and treatments are not covered services.
I took care of people in the VA for years – and saw people using primary care labs that I described in my book – and used group encounters to teach people how to view the relationship between their diet, lifestyle and environmental exposures and their health – and then begin adopting the various diet plans we recommended.

Because I want to facilitate an epidemic of health – I have written several books, have a website and social media where my staff and I post information daily. You need a computer and an internet connection to see the information.
I receive requests daily from people around the globe who want more support and to consult with me. I have created products that provide more support to implement functional medicine principles with higher costs for higher levels of support. I am grateful for the people who choose to buy the additional support services because that allows me to pay staff and cover my costs for conducting webinars, and providing free content on social media. I am grateful that some people want to come for an intensive functional medicine evaluation in my private practice – which again allows me to support my staff so that I can provide as much free content as I do via social media.

There are many functional medicine books available in the library. There are many functional medicine podcasts, interviews and videos you can learn from. You can use my book and work with your primary care team to implement and monitor your progress.

Some of you may decide that your finances are such that you can only work with your primary care team and my book. For the vast majority of people implementing the dietary choices 100% is what restores their health. If you will commit to doing that .. likely you achieve a radical improvement in your health and will have no need for a functional medicine consult. The majority of people I have seen in my clinic at the VA additional testing was not required – people needed emotional help to do the work of changing their diet and lifestyle. They did not need more fancy testing.

Some of you may decide you have the financial resources and want to buy the additional support ( and I am grateful for those who do so I can pay staff to provide as much free content as we do) or consult with a functional medicine practitioner and understand that a functional medicine evaluation is very time intensive for the health professional and the patient.

There are many ways to find diet and lifestyle information and support for your journey. Stay positive. Do what you can. Use the library. Work with your primary care team. Do not obsess over whether you can afford functional medicine. Obsess over learning how to cook at home. Obsess over eating what is recommended and eliminating what is harmful.
Obsess over what you can do.
Let go of what you cannot do or access.
We saw remarkable success in patients who implemented the dietary recommendations – with zero fancy testing. The most critical is to understand that there is a very large difference between doing the diet most of the time (even 95%) and doing the diet all the time – 100%.

Keep working at it and keep working at doing the protocol a little better a little more effectively each week.
It took me 17 years to get my daily program to where I am today… and I am still improving my diet and lifestyle choices. You will also hopefully keep improving yours continually as well.
Terry Wahls

 

My gratitude is immeasurable for Dr. Wahls dedication to teaching everyone who seeks to recover via her reasonably books, webinars, website, online and documentary interviews, paid visits and her annual seminar.

Today was the first day I registered key tones on the keto urine strips. So excited, I feel like I’m back on the fast track. Yesterday and particularly last night was a painful detox. All good this morning. So I don’t scare you with the “painful” term, I’ll explain, very briefly. Gas, a lot of gas that became trapped under my left breast between my ribs, which created a stabbing pain that went on all night. Everyone will have some kind of detox, not everyone will have trapped gas pain like that. Wasn’t fun, but brewed bay leaf tea, took some Tylenol and finally went to sleep at 4:30 am. Right now, I feel like a million bucks! Today’s blog became about other important topics, most especially Dr. Wahls’ message above. Tomorrow, I’ll post more resources.

 

Bonne Sante

If nothing changes, nothing changes

Change is not easy. It usually means the adoption of foreign ideas and concepts along with emotional and physical adaptations that take reasonable time to accept and implement. I often refer to my experience of quitting smoking because it parallel’s well with what and why I am doing the Wahls Protocol. My father was a jazz musician who played accordion. He was a product of a time when most people were smoking. Born in 1933, he began smoking at the age of nine. I grew up watching him chain smoke non filter Camels. He went through four packs a day, not an exaggeration. His two fingers that held the cigarette had permanent tobacco stains. You could hear the sound of him opening and closing his Zippo lighter every ten minutes, “Ka-ching”. Most people had ashtrays in their homes, even if they didn’t smoke, for guests who did. Smoking was expected and allowed almost everywhere. My father said often that it was his right to smoke. Even when it was killing him with Emphysema, he died at age 62 in 1996. A painful, long drawn out twenty-five year illness, the last fifteen in particular…..just like his father before him, who passed at age 60 from the same thing. I heard stories of my grandfather in the hospital under an oxygen tent, lifting his tent off so he could smoke his cigarettes in his hospital room. We think of that now and we think how ridiculous that was.

My mother who also was a heavy smoker, managed to quit in the seventies. As young children in the sixties, my brother and I had candies in the shape of white cigarettes in a “pack” box. We held the cigarette candies between our fingers like we saw our parents and pretended we were smoking, sucking in and blowing out imaginary smoke, then we’d tap our cigarettes on the edge of the imaginary ashtray. So, its no surprise that I started smoking when I was eleven in 1973. Marlboro’s, I loved Marlboro’s. They were apart of my identity. I always had a pack of red and white Marlboro’s with me everywhere I went. The first time I experienced a public restaurant that had a “No smoking” sign in the window was in 1983. It was a Ben and Jerry’s ice cream shop in Western Massachusetts. I’d never heard of them and I was incensed that I couldn’t smoke inside. That was unheard of, “Who do they think they are?”, I exclaimed. I refused to go in and waited outside while my friends had their ice creams. Fast forward to 1992, the hospital I worked in went no smoking on July 4th, Independence Day, now that was maddening. I spent the last three years freely smoking cigarettes out on the floor at the nurses desk. In the mean time, my father, long on oxygen, was getting sicker and sicker. At night when I slept, my feet were cold, and I felt bad in the morning. It became obvious that I had to do something about my smoking and I was furious about it.

It took me the next three years, stopping and starting before I finally quit for good in 1996, not long after my father’s death. That year, we lost five close friends and my father to smoking related illnesses, lung cancer, Emphysema and throat cancer. Five of us, together, supported each other to quit. Three of us stayed stopped. After my diagnosis’ of MS and a compression on my spinal cord that would result in an immanent surgery, I picked cigarettes up again after nine years of not smoking in 2004. I thought, I’ll just smoke for a short time, just to get through this. Feeling like an idiot buying cigarettes at the store the first time and lighting up at home, to have my 14 year old son catch me, calling me, “Puffer!” It was no longer acceptable to be a smoker anymore and I was very embarrassed to be seen smoking and even more embarrassed to smell like a smoker and it had become horribly expensive too.

I couldn’t smoke for a short time, my habit came back full force, only this time it was harder to quit. Cigarettes were different. They had more addictive chemicals added to them, they burned faster too. It seemed no sooner had I lit up, that the cigarette had a long ash already. I spent the next five years starting and stopping till I finally became willing to go to any lengths and stopped for good. This time around though, it took a whole year to be rid of the obsession to smoke as compared to the first time I quit in 1996, just one month for the obsessive cravings to dissipate then.

Suffice it say, that profiteers will do anything to make money. Fillers, chemicals, sugars, and whatever else, inundate our food source, like the increase in addictive fillers in cigarettes. Commercials assault our senses with melted cheese pizza’s, snacks and sweets beckoning us to be hungry, setting off cravings. Illness is rampant these days in a day and age when it should be the opposite. There have been no cures for much of anything in decades. How is that, when we eradicated polio, mumps, scarlet fever, and other childhood illnesses in the 50’s and 60’s. My father is deaf in one ear from his bout with polio. We have drugs that cost tens of thousands of dollars that only manage symptoms and poorly so. That then, need other drugs to combat the side effects, one leading to the next, leading to the next. If you replace all this with cigarettes, it is no less insane and just as outrageous. And like cigarettes, it is just as hard to change eating habits in a culture that, largely, still accepts this as the norm.

Change is hard, but I want my life back and for that, I’ll learn to eat healthy, untainted whole foods, that unfortunately includes wheat products. There is nothing wrong with wheat, the problem is what we’ve done to it in the last one hundred years that is the problem. Watch, “What’s with Wheat” on Netflix to learn what I am referring too. All I know, is ever since I stopped eating sugar, gluten, dairy and began eating six to nine cups of fresh, mostly organic vegetables everyday, I’m healing at a profound rate. Just like smoking, a few people had to make an unpopular stand against it. So, thank you Ben and Jerry’s and anyone else who had that courage.

Matt Embry’s documentary Living Proof is an example of standing up to several such Leviathans, one of which is the MS Society, which has long been tainted by pharmaceutical companies. This is the letter put out by the US MS Society in reference to Matt’s documentary:

Below is a message that was sent to all the National Multiple Sclerosis self-help groups in the United States of America about our award winning documentary ‘Living Proof’:

……………………….

As you are aware, filmmaker Matt Embry is promoting his film around the United States. At this time, we ask that you please refrain from promoting via your Self-Help group.

The National MS Society is a trusted and reliable source of information and resources for people affected by multiple sclerosis. We continue to be here as a supportive partner for each person affected by MS. The Society has not yet reviewed the film and therefore not promoting it. The National MS Society only promotes or endorses content – information, sources, video, film, etc. – after a thorough review of the material, including scientific or clinical review where needed. We only endorse content that is aligned with our strategic plan, including our research strategy that engages leading MS experts around the globe.

Please continue to connect with me with any questions on promoting any third party events. Also, please don’t hesitate to contact me with any questions or concerns. I appreciate your dedication, commitment, and support to the MS community and this request.

Enjoy your day!

Christy A Bomba, MPA CTRS
Manager, Program Implementation and Engagement
National MS Society

Phone: 989-2xx-xxx4
Fax: 989-3xx-xxx3

Includer, Arranger, Woo, Positivity, Communication

JOIN THE MOVEMENT®
Consider a gift to the Society (and get a tax benefit!) Learn more about the ways you can give.
1-800-344-4867 (Information and Referral)”

 

Note: to see the comments to this click on Matt Embry’s name. Well worth the time to read.

After premiering to sold-out crowds and standing ovations at the Toronto International Film Festival, LIVING PROOF will hit theatres across the United States and Canada beginning February 1, 2018. Take a stand for patients, take control of autoimmune disease. Visit www.SeeLivingProof.com to find a screening near you.

 

Bonne Sante

Dr. Wahls research update

For your information on Dr. Wahls research is this research update from Dr. Wahls letter to her mailing list:

2017 has been a tremendous year for our research team, and we are looking forward to the progress that 2018 will bring.

In this last year, seventeen out of forty-one enrolled participants in our clinical trial, Dietary Approaches to Treating MS Related Fatigue, completed the full study. This current study is funded by a $1 million grant from the National MS Society to compare the effectiveness of a low-saturated fat diet (Swank) and the modified Paleolithic diet (Wahls Elimination) at reducing the severity of MS-related fatigue. From the clinical trial participants, we have been able to collect microbiome samples and extract the DNA. We plan to study the bacteria diversity within this next year. Learn more here.

In 2018 we look forward to publishing the Protocol Paper. This publication will focus on the dietary aspects, and provides a precise scientific description of the Wahls Elimination diet. Additionally, projected for publication in the New Year will be the Wahls vs. Swank Menu Analysis. The team has been studying the nutritional adequacy of both diets in their “ideal” state within the recommended daily allowance (not how they may be consumed in real life) using statistical analysis and standard research protocol to compare the nutrient intake of the two diets. Learn more here.

For the future, we look to expand our research with our inter-disciplinary team at the University of Iowa and add an advanced vision study for MS patients. We also hope to study the Wahls Elimination diet vs. usual care for newly diagnosed (pre-medication) MS patients. Lastly, we look forward to expanding our research to conduct a safety study of dietary approaches in treating ALS related symptomsLearn more here.

Thank you to all that have believed and invested in our work—it is because of your generosity that we are able to explore this ground-breaking research. I wish for you strength of mind, body and heart in the New Year!

In health,

Dr. Terry Wahls

If you are interested making a donation to The Wahls Reaserch Fund, go to https://terrywahls.com/about/the-wahls-research-fund/ for more information.

 

Bonne Sante

 

Important update for Living Proof Documentary

Matt Embry
Matt Embry Hello everyone, we are currently holding screenings in cities across the United States in February. We need everyone’s help now to spread the word within your community about this screening and to reserve tickets for showings. If you would like to set up a screening in your city you can sign up to be a captain now free of charge. Please follow this link to see which cities are showing the film on which date and help us in the fight against MS! https://gathr.us/films/living-proof
The above is a message from Matt Embry (the producer of the film). As you can imagine, it takes a break to get a national screening of anything. A small project such as this with minimal backing must be that much harder. As many people as possible should be given the opportunity to at least know that there is an answer for autoimmune illnesses and this documentary does an excellent job of showing that. It is part biography and part expose. It does focus primarily on MS, however it is a fact that most of the methods shown in the documentary apply to any autoimmune conditions. It is important to support it so that maybe with enough push, after its public screenings that I hope many of you will either attend if one is captained in your city in the US or volunteer to captain a screening in your city in the US, it will be picked up by a major network like Netflix, where far more people can watch it. I was lucky to live in Calgary where it premiered three sold out shows at the Calgary Film Festival. I saw two showings with two different sets of friends. It deserves our best effort to help it be seen.
Disclaimer: The second paragraph is my opinion, I don’t have inside information. After looking at the On Demand theater site, its common sense to me that this will need as many voices and as much footwork as possible for it to have the best chance.
Bonne Sante